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Posted on 08-14-2017

SOLAR ECLIPSE

A Solar Eclipse will occur across America on Monday, August 21st, 2017 and may be complete or partial, depending upon on your location  The line of total eclipse (totality) will extend from Northern Oregon to South Carolina.  The eclipse will be visible in many stages even outside the line of totality. 

“Solar Eclipse Eye Safety”

Looking directly at the sun during a solar eclipse is unsafe for your eyes, except during a brief phase when the moon entirely blocks the sun’s face.  Unless you are in the path of totality, keep your solar eclipse glasses on throughout the eclipse.  Four manufactures have certified that their eclipse glasses and handheld solar viewers meet the standards for eye protection:  Rainbow Symphony, American Paper Optics, Thousand Oaks Optical, and TSE17.  Look for one of these manufacturers names AND the ISO reference 12312-2.

Tips:

· Ordinary sunglasses are NOT strong enough to protect your eyes during an eclipse.  Use specially designed glasses and viewers (listed above).

· Wearing solar glasses to view through binoculars, a camera or a telescope will NOT protect your eyes.  Use ONLY specially designed lenses for these devices.

· Do not reuse old glasses, they are unsafe after 3 years.

· If lenses are scratched or wrinkled do not use—they are not safe for viewing the eclipse.

· Look for a listed manufacturer name AND the ISO icon MUST reference 12312-2.

Source:  American Academy of Ophthalmology and American Astronomical Society

To view map and for more information, visit:  www.aoa.org/2017Eclipse or https://eclipse.aas.org or https://eclipse2017.nasa.gov/

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